New Mexico is in the hizz-ouse [Blogrolling]

A few weeks ago, I mentioned something about being half of Jabberwocky to Ethan and, after a sardonic snort, he replied:

You’re only loosely affiliated with Jabberwocky Ecology, right now.

Ouch. But not untrue, sadly. While I have had some grandiose plans for things to post on, I have been sadly remiss in my duties here. So, today when I saw that a friend had emailed me about her new blog adventure, I decided this was an excellent opportunity to get back on the horse (or at least remind myself what a horse looks like!). So here it goes:

An interdisciplinary program called PIBBS (Program in Interdisciplinary Biology and Biomedical Sciences) at the University of New Mexico has launched a blog. BioBlog stories from the field and lab serves as an outlet for students and faculty associated with the program to explore the interface between their experiences in science and outreach to a broader public. The blog starts with a bang with the inaugural piece by Jim Brown (Distinguished Professor and Member of the National Academy of Sciences, not the recently departed soul singer or the famous former football player), “Human ecology, political correctness, and Orwell-speak” which explores the interface between science and political agendas.

This is followed up by a number of great posts, of which some of my favorites include:

Money, Genes and Identity by Sierra Netz, a graduate student at New Mexico, exploring her experience working at customer services for a genetic testing company and what it told her about the general understanding and emerging role of genetics in the broader public.

What’s in a name, by Felisa Smith, Director of PIBBS and Associate Professor, on the the fun insights that can be gained from scientific names

Teachable Moments, by Julian Davis, graduate student at New Mexico, exploring the use of everyday moments to explain biology to her children.

Go over, enjoy the posts, and welcome some more biologists to the interwebs!

About Morgan Ernest

I am an associate professor at Utah State University studying ecology.

Posted on May 5, 2011, in science. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

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